Respiratory Essentials: Breathe Again Roll On.

Looking for a more natural approach to your health and wellness?  Essential oils were created to support our bodies in a more gentle way without harmful synthetic ingredients. Today we are going to talk about a handy roll-on already made for you making respiratory support quick and easy.

With a refreshing and rejuvenating aroma, Breathe Again™ Roll-On is the perfect companion for early mornings, long days, and tough workouts. This blend combines Peppermint, Myrtle, and Copaiba with four different types of Eucalyptus—including Eucalyptus Blue—to create a powerful, invigorating experience. Breathe Again includes ingredients that have the naturally occurring constituent eucalyptol and comes in a convenient roll-on applicator, so you can easily use it anytime, anywhere.
Required disclaimer:
*Information regarding historical use of herbs and aromatic plants is for informational purposes only and is not based on modern science, nor should this information be construed as expected results from use.
RESPIRATORY CARE SPOTLIGHT: BREATHE AGAIN 
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//historical uses of eucalyptus//
Eucalyptus is a fast-growing evergreen tree native to Australia. As an ingredient in many products, it is used to reduce symptoms of coughs, colds, and congestion. It also features in creams and ointments aimed at relieving muscle and joint pain.
In it’s native Australia, Eucalyptus Blue was recognized as the most disinfecting of all eucalyptus and was traditionally used as a to fight off colds and flu.
Topical ointments containing eucalyptus have been used in traditional Aboriginal medicine to support wound healing. Various uses of eucalyptus have spread to other traditional systems around the globe, including Chinese, Indian (Ayurvedic), and Greco-European systems over the past centuries. The French government planted eucalyptus trees in Algeria in 1857. In just five years the trees turned a once marshy land where they were planted, into a drier region, which ultimately reduced the mosquito habitat, giving the eucalyptus the name “fever tree.” The trees went on to be planted in other areas. During the 19th century in England, eucalyptus was used in hospitals to clean urinary catheters. Many studies later revealed that eucalyptus oil contains substances with microbial properties, confirming the British use as a cleaning agent.






//historical uses of peppermint//
Peppermint leaves have been used as a remedy for indigestion since the Ancient Egyptians, and the ancient Greeks and Romans valued it as a stomach soother as well. During the eighteenth century, the herb became popular in Western Europe as a remedy for nausea, vomiting, morning sickness, respiratory infections, and menstrual disorders.
Peppermint was first listed in the London Pharmacopoeia in 1721. In modern times it appears in the British Herbal pharmacopeia as a remedy for intestinal colic, gas, colds, morning sickness, and menstruation pain.









//historical uses of myrtle//
Myrtle occupies a prominent place in the writings of Hippocrates, Pliny, Dioscorides, Galen, and the Arabian writers. It has been prescribed for fever and pain by ancient physicians since at least 2,500 BC in Sumer.
Myrtle's effects are due to high levels of salicylic acid, a compound related to aspirin, and the basis of the modern class of drugs known as NSAIDs.
In several countries, particularly in Europe and China, there has been a tradition for prescribing this substance for sinus infections.




//historical uses of copaiba//
On the Rio Solimoes in northwest Amazonia, copaiba resin is used topically by indigenous tribes as a wound healer, to stop bleeding, for skin sores and psoriasis, and to treat gonorrhea. Healers and curanderos in the Amazon today use copaiba resin for all types of pain, for skin disorders and insect bites, and to cool inflammation.
In Brazilian herbal medicine systems, the resin is used as a strong antiseptic and expectorant for the respiratory tract (including bronchitis and sinusitis), as an anti-inflammatory and antiseptic for the urinary tract (for cystitis, bladder, and kidney infections), as a topical anti-inflammatory agent for all types of skin problems.

Copaiba resin was first recorded in European medicine in 1625 and has been used there since in the treatment of chronic cystitis, bronchitis, chronic diarrhea, and as a topical preparation for hemorrhoids. In the United States, it was an official drug in the U. S. Pharmacopeia from 1820 to 1910.

HOW TO USE BREATHE AGAIN:
 Apply generously to chest and neck as desired.

If you have any questions, comment here or you can email me at hello@marieinmontana.com
Keep Learning,
 Marie


 
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